Chicken Pho

www.cobornsblog.com - Family, Friends & Food with Jayne
Jayne

Spring has arrived and every time I step outside, I can smell that fresh scent of spring and I love it. It’s time for me to get out in the garden and start planting those summer flowers. The days are getting warmer but the evenings are still a little chilly. Even though we are not in the fall season we still have those cooler nights in May and on those evenings, there is nothing better than a hot bowl of soup. Continue reading “Chicken Pho”

Add Color and Nutrition to Your Grill

Eat Healthy, Shop Smart with Ashley. www.cobornsblog.com
Ashley

Hey all- in my world- its grilling season already! We have had a few nice days and you can bet my grill was out cooking away! There is nothing more appetizing than the smell of freshly grilled food! Continue reading “Add Color and Nutrition to Your Grill”

Fresh Meal Planning (3/26-4/1)

Another busy week? We’ve got you covered! Check out this week’s meal plan and shopping list.  Continue reading “Fresh Meal Planning (3/26-4/1)”

The Truth About Fruit Juice

The Truth About Fruit Juice www.cobornsblog.com

Emily
Emily

Hello! I’m Emily, one of your newest Supermarket Registered Dietitians here at Coborn’s! I’m a self-proclaimed foodie and love breaking down the facts for you on the latest nutrition trends. This month’s topic: to juice or not to juice. While juicing is gaining popularity among foodies and health enthusiasts alike, as a Registered Dietitian, I’m leery about recommending this health trend. What can be so wrong with eating your days’ worth of fruits and veggies in one sitting? It encourages consumption of these nutrient powerhouses, right? This is true, however, there’s one important thing missing here: fiber. Continue reading “The Truth About Fruit Juice”

Why it's Important to "Eat the Rainbow!"

Why it's Important to, "Eat the Rainbow"

Eat Healthy, Shop Smart with Ashley. www.cobornsblog.com
Ashley

Eat the rainbow! You may have heard this statement quite often when talking about how one should eat. But you may wonder, what does that actually mean and is it even and important and if so, why?

Let me start out by saying “to eat the rainbow” means to have your plate colorful for every meal, Include a variety of colors for all the different food groups, especially fruits and vegetables. I mean seriously is it honestly appetizing to eat a plate that is all the same color…. BORING!

Look at the three plates below and you tell me what you think about the colors on these plates. It is true, we eat with our eyes before we even begin to eat with our mouths. In order to want to eat a food, we must have a plate that looks appetizing, right?

Why it's Important to, "Eat the Rainbow."Next, compare those three plates that are above to these three much more colorful plates that are on the right side of the page, which set of plates looks more appetizing to you?? I know what set I would pick!

The second, and the main reason we say it is important to eat the rainbow is because every color stands for a different vitamin and or Why it's Important to, "Eat the Rainbow."antioxidant and each vitamin and antioxidant help our bodies in a different way, so we want to have a variety of them and ensure we get all the different ones throughout our day and week.  In general, antioxidants reverse cell damage which can reduce our risk of getting sick.

Look at the lists below from the heart center dietitians of CentraCare;  here are the different colors and the different vitamins and antioxidants and what they do for our body.

Eating The Rainbow

Red fruits and vegetables are colored by natural plant pigments called “lycopene” or “anthocyanins.” Lycopene in tomatoes, watermelon and pink grapefruit, for example, may help reduce risk of several types of cancer, especially prostate cancer. Lycopene in foods containing cooked tomatoes, such as spaghetti sauce, and a small amount of fat are absorbed better than lycopene from raw tomatoes.

Anthocyanins in strawberries, raspberries, red grapes and other fruits and vegetables act as powerful antioxidants that protect cells from damage. Antioxidants are linked with keeping our hearts healthy, too.

These are some examples of the Red Group:

  • Red apples
  • Beets
  • Red cabbage
  • Cherries
  • Cranberries
  • Pink grapefruit
  • Red grapes
  • Red peppers
  • Pomegranates
  • Red potatoes
  • Radishes
  • Raspberries
  • Rhubarb
  • Strawberries
  • Tomatoes
  • Watermelon

Orange/Yellow fruits and vegetables are usually colored by natural plant pigments called “carotenoids.” Beta-carotene in sweet potatoes, pumpkins and carrots is converted to vitamin A, which helps maintain healthy mucous membranes and healthy eyes. Scientists have also reported that carotenoid-rich foods can help reduce risk of cancer, heart disease and can improve immune system function.

One study found that people who ate a diet high in carotenoid-rich vegetables were 43 percent less likely to develop age-related macular degeneration, an eye disorder common among the elderly, which can lead to blindness.

Carotenoids also may be good for your heart. One study found that men with high cholesterol who ate plenty of vegetables high in carotenoids had a 36 percent lower chance of heart attack and death than their counterparts who shunned vegetables.

Citrus fruits like oranges are an excellent source of vitamin C and folate, a B vitamin that helps reduce risk of birth defects.

Some examples from the Orange/Yellow Group include:

  • Yellow apples
  • Apricots
  • Butternut squash
  • Cantaloupe
  • Carrots
  • Grapefruit
  • Lemons
  • Mangoes
  • Nectarines
  • Oranges
  • Papayas
  • Peaches
  • Pears
  • Yellow peppers
  • Persimmons
  • Pineapple
  • Pumpkin
  • Rutabagas
  • Yellow summer or winter squash
  • Sweet corn
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Tangerines
  • Yellow tomatoes
  • Yellow watermelon

Green fruits and vegetables are colored by natural plant pigment called “chlorophyll.” Some members of the green group, including spinach and other dark leafy greens, green peppers, peas, cucumber and celery, contain lutein. Lutein works with another chemical, zeaxanthin, found in corn, red peppers, oranges, grapes and egg yolks to help keep eyes healthy. Together, these chemicals may help reduce risk of cataracts and age-related macular degeneration, which can lead to blindness if untreated.

The “indoles” in broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and other cruciferous vegetables may help protect against some types of cancer. Leafy greens such as spinach and broccoli are excellent sources of folate, a B vitamin that helps reduce risk of birth defects.

Some examples of the Green Group include:

  • Green apples
  • Artichokes
  • Asparagus
  • Avocados
  • Green beans
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Green cabbage
  • Cucumbers
  • Green grapes
  • Honeydew melon
  • Kiwi
  • Lettuce
  • Limes
  • Green onions
  • Peas
  • Green pepper
  • Spinach
  • Zucchini

Blue/Purple fruits and vegetables are colored by natural plant pigments called “anthocyanins.” Anthocyanins in blueberries, grapes and Eat the Rainbowraisins act as powerful antioxidants that protect cells from damage. They may help reduce risk of cancer, stroke and heart disease. Other studies have shown that eating more blueberries is linked with improved memory function and healthy aging.

These are some examples of the Blue/Purple Group:

  • Blackberries
  • Blueberries
  • Eggplant
  • Figs
  • Juneberries
  • Plums
  • Prunes
  • Purple grapes
  • Raisins

White fruits and vegetables are colored by pigments called “anthoxanthins.” They may contain health-promoting chemicals such as allicin, which may help lower cholesterol and blood pressure and may help reduce risk of stomach cancer and heart disease. Some members of the white group, such as bananas and potatoes, are good sources of the mineral potassium, too.

Some examples of the White Group include:

  • Bananas
  • Cauliflower
  • Turnips
  • Ginger
  • Jicama
  • Mushrooms
  • Onions
  • Parsnips
  • Potatoes

I hope I have convinced you that it is actually more than just a statement to “eat the rainbow,” try to put it in to practice more often than not and your body will thank you! Don’t forget even though it is the holiday season there are many festive ways to create colorful trays of fruits and vegetables that taste yummy!

Peace and Wellness,

Ashley

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