How to Incorporate Flax Seed into Your Diet

A Natural Approach with Cheryl - www.cobornsblog.com
Cheryl

First a little tutorial about flax seeds… Flax is a super seed grown mostly in Canada, North Dakota and South Dakota. Minnesota and Wisconsin also produce flax.

Canada is the leading producer of brown flax seed and the Dakota’s tend to produce more of the golden flax. There is little difference in the two colors but many prefer the gold because it is easier to sneak into recipes, the brown is more visible in those muffins! Continue reading “How to Incorporate Flax Seed into Your Diet”

The Truth About Fruit Juice

The Truth About Fruit Juice www.cobornsblog.com

Emily
Emily

Hello! I’m Emily, one of your newest Supermarket Registered Dietitians here at Coborn’s! I’m a self-proclaimed foodie and love breaking down the facts for you on the latest nutrition trends. This month’s topic: to juice or not to juice. While juicing is gaining popularity among foodies and health enthusiasts alike, as a Registered Dietitian, I’m leery about recommending this health trend. What can be so wrong with eating your days’ worth of fruits and veggies in one sitting? It encourages consumption of these nutrient powerhouses, right? This is true, however, there’s one important thing missing here: fiber. Continue reading “The Truth About Fruit Juice”

What Vitamins Are In Your Food? Should You Supplement?

To Supplement or Not to Supplement?

Eat Healthy, Shop Smart with Ashley. www.cobornsblog.com
Ashley

Hello Everyone!
I cannot tell you how many times I get asked… Should I be on a supplement? If so which one, how much, etc… I’m sure you are wondering or have wondered the same thing! According to the U.S. Dietary Guidelines, for Americans it is recommended that your nutritional needs, and all your vitamins and minerals should be met primarily through food consumption as our body is able to digest, absorb and utilize those nutrients best. However, due to certain health conditions, supplements may be necessary for some people. It is always best to check with your provider for more information.

Here is a direct quote from the Mayo Clinic, “Supplements aren’t intended to be a food substitute because they can’t replicate all of the nutrients and PregnantWomanbenefits of whole foods, such as fruits and vegetables. So depending on your situation and your eating habits, dietary supplements may not be worth the expense.”

Whole foods provide more than one nutrient at a time and the nutrients in food work synergistically together in a way that is not yet fully understood compared to when we take Supplements that are individual Vitamins. For example, eating a whole fruit provides many Vitamins and Minerals and Antioxidants, as well as Fiber, something not found in most supplements. Fiber is very important to help keep us fuller for longer, keep our Blood Glucose Levels more consistent as well as playing a role in lowering Cholesterol, and keeping us regular of course!

According to the Mayo Clinic, a list of potential candidates for supplements include:

• Women who may become pregnant should get 400 micrograms a day of folic acid from fortified foods or supplements, in addition to eating foods that naturally contain folate.
• Women who are pregnant should take a prenatal vitamin that includes iron or a separate iron supplement.
• Adults age 50 or older should eat foods fortified with vitamin B-12, such as fortified cereals, or take a multivitamin that contains B-12 or a separate B-12 supplement.
• Adults age 65 and older who do not live in assisted living or nursing homes should take 800 international units (IU) of vitamin D daily to reduce the risk of falls.

Dietary supplements may also be appropriate if you:

• Don’t eat well or consume less than 1,600 calories a day.
• Are a vegan or a vegetarian who eats a limited variety of foods.
• Don’t obtain two to three servings of fish a week. If you have difficulty achieving this amount, some experts recommend adding a fish oil supplement to your daily regimen.
• Are a woman who experiences heavy bleeding during your menstrual period.
• Have a medical condition that affects how your body absorbs or uses nutrients, such as chronic diarrhea, food allergies, food intolerance, or a disease of the liver, gallbladder, intestines or pancreas.
• Have had surgery on your digestive tract and are not able to digest and absorb nutrients properly.

Talk to your Doctor:

Vitamin LabelTalk to your doctor or a dietitian about which supplements and what doses might be appropriate for you. Be sure to ask about possible side effects and interactions with any medications you already take.

If you choose to take supplements make sure you doctor is aware of this. Be sure to read the label and know now many vitamins and minerals you are getting per serving, pay attention to the serving size and how many times you should take the supplement throughout the day. If you don’t, you may not be absorbing the nutrients. For example, if you take all your calcium at once, let’s say 1200mg, that is waste and you are putting strain on your kidneys as you are only able to absorb 500 mg at once. Calcium without Vitamin D to help absorb it and can cause it to build up and settle in arteries instead of our bones.

Also pay attention to how much of each nutrient you are getting from your supplement, food intake, you don’t want to overdo it, there can be negative side effects of getting too much of a certain nutrient, believe it or not. Many people take multiple supplements including pre and post workout supplements as well as a multivitamin and others, add up all those amounts of each nutrient plus what you are getting from your daily food and you may be surprised how much you are taking in, most likely way more than you need and way more than your body can utilize. Just because something is healthy or good for us doesn’t mean more is better! Finally check the expiration date and store your supplements in a proper place at room temperature; follow the bottle instructions, and remember to keep up with safety alerts from the FDA.

The Bottom Line:

Eat a well-balanced diet with all the food groups in proper portions at each meal, most of the time, and in general there should be no need for supplementation. However, Vitamin Dbecause we live in MN and are far from the sun most of the year, it’s not possible to get enough Vitamin D from the sun all year long, so you may benefit from a Vitamin D supplement. Be sure to check with your physician as they know your health history and health conditions best!

According to the Mayo Clinic, whole food is not to be replaced by supplements, as supplements cannot replicate all the health benefits of whole foods. For example, fruits and vegetables carry many different nutrients that provide health benefits to the human body. Therefore, depending on your diet and current physical state, spending money on supplements may not be necessary. Over the past few years there has been increasing evidence that multivitamins and single or combination type vitamin/mineral supplements may not provide the health benefit sought by you, the consumer. In some cases the opposite or no beneficial effects have been reported. So save that money that you would spend on supplements and spend it on more fruits and vegetables, low fat dairy, lean protein, and whole grains!

Peace and Wellness,
Ashley

Click Here for more articles written by Ashley

Eat Healthy Shop Smart with Ashley - www.cobornsblog.com
Eat Healthy Shop Smart

5 Ways to add Beans to your Diet!

Beans are good for you! Are you getting enough in your diet? Learn more at cobornsblog.com

Eat Healthy, Shop Smart with Ashley. www.cobornsblog.com
Ashley

You may have heard that beans are good for you! I’m here to reiterate that message and put some extra emphasis on that statement. Beans are AMAZING for you and you should try to incorporate them as often as possible.

Why? Beans are an excellent source of fiber, protein, and iron.  They are unique from other proteins sources such as animal products because they have fiber – a nutrient that is lacking from the average American diet. Oh, and I almost forgot to mention, my favorite benefit, they are so cheap! People tell me all the time, I can’t afford to eat healthy because it costs more! Not always the case and here is a great example of that – I’m referring to chickpeas (garbanzo beans), black beans, navy beans, pinto beans, cannellini beans, aduki beans and kidney beans NOT green beans.

Buying a variety is best as they have slightly different nutrients and different tastes so it depends on the recipe and what the recipe calls for.

As far as nutrition it is best to buy beans in all different forms canned and dried. Note that canned is just as nutritious as dried.  The main concern will be the added sodium, but if you buy no salt added or reduced sodium that takes care of the salt.  Even if you buy regular canned beans, draining and rinsing the beans for 2-4 minutes reduces the sodium by up to 41%.  Buying canned is so much more convenient as you don’t have to cook them and you will probably eat them more often thus reaping their nutritional benefits as compared to if you have to cook them each time.

Here are my top 5 ways to add more beans to your diet!

5 ways to add beans to your diet - www.cobornsblog.com

Here are a few of my favorite recipes to get you started! And, of course, I had to add the recipe for black bean brownies!

Fudgy Black Bean Brownies

Fudgy Black Bean Brownies - www.cobornsblog.com #Vegetarian

Fudgy Black Bean Brownies
Serves: 16
 
Ingredients
  • 15 Oz. Can Black Beans, drained and rinsed
  • 3 Large Eggs
  • 3 T. Canola Oil
  • ¾ Cup Granulated Sugar
  • ½ Cup Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
  • 1 tsp. Vanilla Extract
  • ½ tsp. Peppermint Extract (optional)
  • ½ tsp. Baking Powder
  • Pinch of Salt
  • ½ Cup Mini Semi-sweet Chocolate Chips, divided
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F.
  2. Lightly oil or coat an 8×8-inch baking pan or dish with nonstick cooking spray and set aside.
  3. Place the black beans in the bowl of a food processor and process until smooth and creamy.
  4. Add eggs, oil, sugar, cocoa powder, vanilla extract, peppermint extract if desired, baking powder and salt.
  5. Process until smooth.
  6. Add ¼ cup of the chips and pulse a few times until the chips are incorporated.
  7. Pour the batter into the prepared pan, smooth the top with a rubber spatula and sprinkle with the remaining ¼ cup chocolate chips.
  8. Bake 30 to 35 minutes or until the edges start to pull away from the sides of the pan and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.
  9. Cool in the pan before slicing into 2-inch squares.

 

Quinoa Salad with Black Beans and Mango

Quinoa Salad with Black Beans and Mango Recipe - www.cobornsblog.com #Vegetarian #Vegan

Quinoa Salad with Black Beans and Mango
 
Ingredients
  • 1 Mango, peeled and diced small
  • 1 Red Pepper, seeded and diced as small as you can get it
  • 1 Cup Scallion, chopped
  • 1 Cup Fresh Cilantro, chopped
  • 2 T. Red Wine Vinegar
  • 2 T. Grapeseed Oil
  • ¼ tsp. Salt
  • 2 Cups Quinoa, cooked and cooled
  • 1½ Cups Black Beans, drained and rinsed (a 15-ounce can)
Instructions
  1. Combine mango, red pepper, scallions, and cilantro in a mixing bowl.
  2. Add the red wine vinegar, grapeseed oil, and salt and stir to combine.
  3. Add the quinoa and stir until everything is well incorporated.
  4. Fold in the black beans.
  5. Serve immediately or let it sit for a bit to let the flavors meld.
Notes
Dietitian’s Tip: The reason you want to rinse the beans is to get rid of the excess salt and sodium.

 

Roasted Red Pepper Hummus

Roasted Red Pepper Hummus - www.cobornsblog.com

Roasted Red Pepper Hummus
 
Ingredients
  • 15 oz. Can Chickpeas / Garbanzo Beans, rinsed
  • ⅓ Cup Tahini
  • ¼ Cup Lemon Juice
  • 2 T. Olive Oil
  • 2 Cloves Garlic, crushed
  • ½-3/4 Cup Roasted Red Peppers
Instructions
  1. In a food processor, combine beans, tahini, lemon juice and olive oil.
  2. Process until smooth.
  3. Add red peppers and garlic until desired consistency.
  4. Garnish with parsley.
  5. Serve warm or cold with pita bread or toasted pita chips or fresh vegetables.

Quinoa Black Bean Burgers

Quinoa Black Bean Burgers - www.cobornsblog.com

Quinoa Black Bean Burgers
Author: 
Serves: 5
 
Ingredients
  • 1 (15 oz) Can Black Beans, rinsed and drained
  • ¼ Cup Quinoa
  • ½ Cup Water
  • ½ Cup Bread Crumbs
  • ¼ Cup Yellow Bell Pepper, minced
  • 2 T. Minced Onion
  • 1 Large Clove Garlic, minced
  • 1.5 tsp. Ground Cumin
  • ½ tsp. Salt
  • 1 tsp. Hot Pepper Sauce (such as Frank's RedHot®)
  • 1 Egg
  • 3 T. Olive Oil
Instructions
  1. Bring quinoa and water to a boil in a saucepan.
  2. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer until the quinoa is tender and the water has been absorbed, about 15 to 20 minutes.
  3. Roughly mash the black beans with a fork leaving some whole black beans in a paste-like mixture.
  4. Mix quinoa, bread crumbs, bell pepper, onion, garlic, cumin, salt, hot pepper sauce, and egg into the black beans using your hands.
  5. Form black bean mixture into 5 patties.
  6. Heat the olive oil in a large skillet.
  7. Cook the patties in the hot oil until heated through, 2 to 3 minutes per side.

 

Peace and Wellness,
Ashley
Coborn’s, Inc. Supermaket Registered Dietitian

Click Here for more articles written by Ashley
Eat Healthy Shop Smart with Ashley - www.cobornsblog.com

What is a Leek?

What is a Leek? www.cobornsblog.com

www.cobornsblog.com - Produce Philosophy with Mike
Mike P.

“It looks like a green onion”, but it is a leek.

We hear that all the time in the Produce world. Leek is slowly growing in popularity, but still remains in the category as somewhat of a gourmet type item. They have been around for many, many years, yet many people have never heard of them. Availability is year round and prices do not fluctuate much. The fall/ winter season seems to be when people use them the most. My favorite way that I have enjoyed leek is in soup, specifically Potato Leek soup. I love the mild, creamy onion flavor that it offers. Very simple, and easy to make. Leeks can also be sliced as a relish, eaten with a dip or raw, braised in the oven, diced, or added to a salad which adds a crunchy onion flavor.

Some of the health benefits known about leeks are that they are high in fiber and potassium. They are also known to help lower cholesterol and have many other vitamins benefits as well.

Leeks grow in the ground like a regular onion. The root and the white part are underground with the green tops sticking out. Because of this, the most important thing is to make sure that they are cleaned properly before using.  Cleaning them is quite easy. Cut the roots off of the bottom and chop off the top part between green and white. Then cut again lengthwise, and rinse under cold water. The dirt in there comes out pretty easy. Once they are clean, you are ready to dice up the leek. The white part is the part that is typically eaten. They are the most tender and have a mild flavor. The all green part is quite tough, with a strong flavor.

Potato Leek Soup

Potato Leek Soup Recipe - www.cobornsblog.com

This is very simple and easy to do. You could add more ingredients if you so choose. Other things I may add from time to time might include diced carrots as another vegetable or diced ham or cooked chicken if you are looking for meat in yours. If you’re looking to try a different kind of soup, give this one a try. It is different, but oh so good.

Potato Leek Soup
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 6
 
Ingredients
  • 3 Large Leek, cut lengthwise, separate, and clean. Pale white and white part only, dice, and chop.
  • 2 T. Butter
  • 2 Cups Water
  • 2 Cups (1 can) Chicken Broth
  • 2 Lbs Potatoes, peeled, and diced
  • ¼ Cup Fresh or Dried Parsley
  • ½ tsp. Dried Thyme
Instructions
  1. Cook diced leek in butter with salt and pepper in a medium sauce pan.
  2. Cover and cook on low heat for about 10 minutes checking often, as you do not want leeks to brown at all.
  3. Add water, broth, and potatoes.
  4. Bring to a simmer and cook for about 20 minutes.
  5. Take about half of your soup mixture out of the pan and put in blender to puree it. This will still give you some soup that will have some chunks. You could puree all of it; if you want it real smooth and creamy with no chunks - your call.
  6. Return mixture to pan, add thyme and parsley.
  7. Season with more salt, 1 to 2 teaspoons, and ground pepper to desired taste.
Notes
Replace chicken broth with vegetable broth for a vegetarian option.

Enjoy!

Mike
Coborn’s, Inc. Produce Merchandiser

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Produce Philosophy with Mike - www.cobornsblog.com