Squash: Nutritional Benefits and Butter Squash Mac N Cheese Recipe

Amy

One of my favorite parts about fall is the change of the produce that’s in season. In my house growing up, we always could count on squash being served at the table, especially this time of year.  When you come in and shop at your local Coborn’s, you’ll have a variety of squash available. How do you know which one to choose? What do you do with it? Many of you, like myself, have recipes passed down from generations on the classic brown sugar squash that you have at Thanksgiving or maybe you’re one who only thinks of baby food when they hear squash. (oh come on, I know many of you are thinking it!)  If you haven’t tried squash before, or haven’t had it for a while, I challenge you to try my favorite squash recipe- see below. It’s been a hit with both adults and children in my house, plus it’s delicious- the whole family will love it! Continue reading “Squash: Nutritional Benefits and Butter Squash Mac N Cheese Recipe”

Back to School

Eat Healthy, Shop Smart with Ashley. www.cobornsblog.com
Ashley

Well folks it’s that time of year again- I hope you all had a fabulous summer and remember we do still have 1 more month let of summer season before,  its BACK TO SCHOOL! Continue reading “Back to School”

Next-Generation Coborn’s Store – Part 2

www.cobornsblog.com - Family, Friends & Food with Jayne
Jayne

Hi there! I hope you were able to check out my Next-Generation Store Tour – Part 1 video and blog from September. I am now here to take you on part 2, simply because we have so many great, new offerings in our Coborn’s Marketplace stores, I couldn’t fit it all into one blog, or video for that matter. In this video I stop and talk to the Coborn’s Store Director in Isanti, Mary, we visit the Bake Shoppe, Pharmacy and Supermarket Registered Dietitian, come on let’s go!

Continue reading “Next-Generation Coborn’s Store – Part 2”

Trade Up for a Better After School Snack

Trade Up for a Better Back to School Snack! #NuVal www.cobornsblog.comHey All! As I’m sure you are fully aware it is back to school, whether you are ready or not! Last month I blogged about nutritious breakfast options to fuel you and your child’s body before beginning your long day! All meals are important, but breakfast seems to be one of the most challenging as it tends to be very rushed.  Parent’s aren’t usually responsible for lunches as it is offered at the schools and the school lunches are now more nutritious than ever and continue to head in that direction!  So, today I will be blogging about better for you snacks for kids after school.  It may be before a sport or as they arrive off the bus.  After school snacks can be very tricky as a lot of the front of package labeling can be very misleading.

I remember as I was getting off the bus from school, I was starving! I couldn’t wait to have an after school snack.  Unfortunately, I wasn’t provided with the most nutritious options.  Back then, there wasn’t such a push for nutritious options and we were just on the verge of the childhood obesity epidemic. I would have snacks like mini corn dogs, pizza rolls, pizza, ice cream, cookies, cheese balls, Little Debbie’s nutty bars (they had peanut butter, so they had to be good for you), and easy mac! YIKES! I am honestly embarrassed to share that being a dietitian today!!!  I guess that just makes my improvements more significant.

Check out the image for all of my suggest snack trade ups! I hope these provide you with some ideas for healthy snack options for you and your families.

Happy Back to School!

Eat Healthy, Shop Smart with Ashley. www.cobornsblog.com

Peace and Wellness,
Ashley
Coborn’s, Inc. Registered Supermarket Dietitian

Click Here for more articles written by Ashley

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The Health Benefits of Milk

www.cobornsblog.com - The Health Benefits of Milk

www.cobornsblog.com - Eat Healthy, Shop Smart with Ashley
Ashley
Coborn’s Dietitian

Time to get your drink on! Your drink on for milk of course!

Milk can be a great way to help you meet your needs for calcium, vitamin D, and protein, among other nutrients such as riboflavin and potassium.

As a dietitian, this is the time of year I begin to get concerned about people’s dietary intake of vitamin D.  As you already can tell by the change in the weather, we are tilting further away from the sun.  This means that you can no longer receive enough vitamin D from the sun.  Thus, it is even more important that you focus on foods with vitamin D and let me tell you there are not too many foods with it, so thank goodness there is milk!

Milk can provide up to 25% of your daily needs of vitamin D.

You may find yourself wondering why is there all the talk about vitamin D, what is the big deal?  Well, let me put it this way, vitamin D is THE BIG DEAL.  Vitamin D is vital to a variety of functions in our body.  Recent research is showing a positive correlation between Vitamin D and different disease states.

Vitamin D = Strong Bones.

www.cobornsblog,com - The body needs Vitamin D to absorb Calcium. Milk can provide up to 25% of your daily needs of Vitamin D.I think most of you are aware that vitamin D helps you to have strong bones. The body needs vitamin D to absorb calcium. Without enough vitamin D, one can’t form enough of the hormone calcitriol (known as the “active vitamin D”). This in turn leads to insufficient calcium absorption from the diet. In this situation, the body must take calcium from its stores in the skeleton, which weakens existing bone and prevents the formation of strong, new bone.

You can get vitamin D in three ways: through the skin, from the diet, and from supplements. Experts recommend a daily intake of 600 IU (International Units) of vitamin D up to age 70. Men and women over age 70 should increase their uptake to 800 IU daily, which also can be obtained from supplements or vitamin D-rich foods such as egg yolks, saltwater fish, liver, and fortified milk.

According to the National Institute of Health, here are some other functions of the body that vitamin D helps with:

  • Immune system, which helps you to fight infection
  • Muscle function
  • Cardiovascular function, for a healthy heart and circulation
  • Respiratory system –for healthy lungs and airways
  • Brain development
  • Anti-cancer effects

Doctors are still working to fully understand how vitamin D works within your body and how it affects your overall health.

A lack of vitamin D

www.cobornsblog.com - Why Milk is Vital to your Bone HealthIf your body doesn’t get enough vitamin D to keep it healthy, this is called vitamin D deficiency. Severe vitamin D deficiency can sometimes cause a condition called rickets in children and a condition called osteomalacia in adults. Both of these conditions cause soft, thin, and brittle bones.

A lack of vitamin D has also been linked to some other conditions such as cancer, asthma, type-II diabetes, high blood pressure, depression, Alzheimer’s and autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis, Crohn’s and type-I diabetes.

According to the Vitamin D Council, there are some groups of people that are more likely to have vitamin D deficiency. The following people are more likely to be lacking in vitamin D:

  • People with darker skin. The darker your skin the more sun you need to get the same amount of vitamin D as a fair-skinned person. For this reason, if you’re Black, you’re much more likely to have vitamin D deficiency that someone who is White.
  • People who spend a lot of time indoors during the day. For example, if you’re housebound, work nights or are in hospital for a long time.
  • People who cover their skin all of the time. For example, if you wear sunscreen or if your skin is covered with clothes.
  • People that live in the North of the United States or Canada. This is because there are fewer hours of overhead sunlight the further away you are from the equator.
  • Older people have thinner skin than younger people and this may mean that they can’t produce as much vitamin D.
  • Infants that are breastfed and aren’t given a vitamin D supplement. If you’re feeding your baby on breast milk alone, and you don’t give your baby a vitamin D supplement or take a supplement yourself, your baby is more likely to be deficient in vitamin D.
  • Pregnant women.
  • People who are very overweight (obese).
    • The symptoms of vitamin D deficiency are sometimes vague and can include tiredness and general aches and pains. Some people may not have any symptoms at all.
    • If you have a severe vitamin D deficiency you may have pain in your bones and weakness, which may mean you have difficulty getting around. You may also have frequent infections. However, not everyone gets these symptoms.
    • If you think you may have vitamin D deficiency, you should see your physician, or have a blood test to check your vitamin D levels

I hope you now understand more fully why vitamin D is so important! If you get one thing out of this… drink your milk, and make sure it is low fat of course!

Peace and Wellness,
Ashley
Coborn’s Registered Dietitian

 

Click Here for more blog articles written by Ashley

Eat Healthy Shop Smart with Ashley - www.cobornsblog.com

Resources

Office of Dietary Supplements
Vitamin D Council
National Institutes of Health