Grilled Peach Recipes

www.cobornsblog.com - Family, Friends & Food with Jayne
Jayne

Hi Everybody!!
We are getting real close to canning season and preserving those wonderful peaches, jams and sauces and I wanted to introduce you to a wonderful peach that just hit our Coborn’s stores.   They are so awesome, fresh and juicy.  Don’t pass up an opportunity to try these because they are great!!!  Their season starts from the beginning of June towards the end of September and they are awesome when using them for pies, jams, jellies, baking and grilling.  Here are a couple recipes that I tried and I want to pass on to you because they were so great! Continue reading “Grilled Peach Recipes”

Tons of Tomatoes!

Neighborhood-Salsa

www.cobornsblog.com - Coborn's Blogger - Rebecca K.
Rebecca

Does it ever seem like you have tomatoes coming out of your ears? Each fall, my family pulls in the last of the half-green tomatoes and sets them on the front porch to finish ripening. It never seems like much, until pail after pail is unloaded and eventually we realize we overplanted once again.

Typically, this means we have a wonderful salsa-making session in store, along with making a bunch of spaghetti sauce. The whole family gets involved in the tomato prep process, and it’s great to involve even itsy bitsy children. Our little guy has the very important job of making sure the tomatoes are clean. We give him a couple of big bowls of water, a wooden spoon and some towels. He sticks some tomatoes into one water bowl, dunks them with the spoon, and then transfers them to the next bowl of water to rinse, dunking them again with the spoon before moving them to the towels. We found that one of our twins is naturally persnickety, which makes her a perfect tomato skin peeler. HerSalsa-Chefs twin sister loves getting messy. Her job is to take the skinned tomato, shove her thumbs up inside the walls of it, and scrape the seeds down into the sink.

Last year, our autumn got away from us, so I simply washed those tomatoes, stuck them in zippered freezer bags, and froze them until we had a free weekend later in the year. Sure enough, as they thawed, the skins slid right off, saving us a step of having to par-boil in order to remove the bitter skins.

A few years ago, our neighbors were trading jars of salsa, everyone sampling the others and enjoying the variety of flavors. We discovered that our next door neighbors’ salsa tasted remarkably similar to ours. A comparison of “family” recipes revealed that our recipes were nearly identical – the only difference was that ours included carrots! We all had a good laugh over that and both adjusted our recipe cards to say “Neighborhood Salsa.”

This year, we’re freezing a bunch of tomatoes again for salsas and sauces, but not before pulling out a handful of the reddest cherry tomatoes out for my favorite lunch dish: Tabouli. This fresh meal originates from Lebanon and is very healthy and delicious (it’s sometimes spelled Tabbouleh). It’s full of parsley, tomatoes, onion, herbs, lemon, quinoa and bulgur wheat, which is a rich source of protein, fiber and minerals, and yet is low in calories and fat. I like to serve it in pitas and while it may look pretty earthy, even my meat-loving family enjoys it.

Below are the recipes for my favorite Neighborhood Salsa and Tabouli. Enjoy!

Neighborhood Salsa
 
Ingredients
  • ⅓ Cup Sugar
  • 8 Cups Tomatoes, peeled and seeded
  • 2½ Cups Onions, chopped
  • 1½ Cups Green Pepper, chopped
  • 1 Cup Jalapeño, diced
  • 6 Cloves of Garlic, minced
  • 2 tsp. Cumin
  • 2 tsp. Ground Pepper
  • ⅛ Cup Canning Salt
  • ⅓ Cup White Vinegar
  • 15 Oz. Can Tomato Sauce
  • 12 Oz. Can Tomato Paste
  • 1 Cup Carrots, shredded (if you need to mellow out the heat of the Jalapeños)
Instructions
  1. Combine all ingredients and bring to a slow boil for 10 minutes.
  2. Taste test. If it’s too hot, add a half cup of shredded carrots and let cook for another 10 minutes.
  3. Taste test again. If it’s still too hot, add another half cup of carrots and look for 10 more minutes.
  4. Seal in jars and cook in a hot bath for 10 minutes. (I follow the Ball canning instructions exactly for food safety.)
Notes
Tomato skins and seeds both are bitter, so you can get rid of them.

 Tabouli

Tabouli

Tabouli
 
Ingredients
  • 2 Cups Prepared Quinoa/Bulgur Blend (Full Circle brand in the Natural Foods department)
  • 1 Pinch Salt
  • ¼ Cup Olive or Grape Seed Oil
  • ½ tsp. Pepper
  • ¼ Cup Lemon Juice
  • 3 Medium Tomatoes, diced
  • 2 Bunches Green Onions, diced
  • 1 Bunch Fresh Parsley, destemmed and chopped coarsely
  • 2 tsp. Fresh Mint, chopped finely
Instructions
  1. Combine all ingredients and cover tightly.
  2. Let the mixture marinate in the refrigerator for a couple days.
  3. Serve in pita pockets, in lettuce wraps, or on crackers.
Notes
• Invite others to help with plucking the parsley off the stems. The stems are bitter. It’s a tedious process, but the kids are great helpers and it’s an easy way for them to use their fine motor skills.
• Some chefs mince the parsley up very finely, but we prefer ours a little heartier. It stays fluffier – more like a salad and less like a dip.
• If your tabouli is not flavorful enough, add more salt and more lemon juice. My family prefers the recipe as listed above, but I always set aside some for myself and then I sprinkle a lot more lemon juice over the top of it.

 

Rebecca
Coborn’s, Inc. Communications Manager

Click Here for more articles written by Rebecca.

www.cobornsblog.com - Fun with Family with Rebecca

 

Homemade Salsa

Homemade Salsa www.cobornsblog.com

Ashley Maurer www.cobornsblog.comSalsa has always been something we had on hand growing up, and that is still true for me today. It’s a great addition to many recipes and is always a hit when put out with chips for an appetizer. One of the best things about salsa is it can be made so many different ways using such a large variety of ingredients.

I decided to try canning salsa this year for the first time and I am definitely happy with the result. I’ll be adding this to my yearly canning list from now on! This is such a fun thing to make since you have so much control over what to put in it.

Here is how I did mine:

 

Ingredients:

5 Cups Tomatoes, peeled & cored (about 13-15 medium)
2 ½ Cups Bell Peppers, chopped & seeded (2-3 medium)
2 ½ Cups Onions (2 Large)
1 Cup Hot Peppers, chopped & seeded (10-20 Jalapeno, Serrano, etc.)
¾ Cup Cider Vinegar
1 Tbsp. Cilantro, finely chopped

Equipment:
8-10 Half Pint Jars, with lids and rings
Knife
Cutting Board
2 Medium Bowls
2 Large Pots
Small Pot
Slotted Spoon
Funnel Or Glass Measuring Jar With Handle
Jar Lifter (optional)
Jar Separator (optional)

Homemade Salsa Steps www.cobornsblog.comDirections:
Start by putting hot water into pots. If you bought tomatoes, make sure to remove any stickers and vines. Put tomatoes into one of the large pots and bring to a boil.

In the other large pot, bring half pint jars to a boil to sanitize. Bring lids to a simmer in small pot.

While those are going, start chopping other veggies, making sure to wear gloves while cutting peppers. This can be time consuming so keep an eye on the tomatoes as you chop. Just toss all the finished veggies in a bowl.

The skins of the tomatoes will split, meaning they are ready to take out. We let ours cook for a while even after they split since it softens them further. It’s not an exact science; so don’t worry if they stay in a little longer while you are finishing up chopping other veggies.

Take a slotted spoon and carefully scoop out tomatoes setting them in a separate bowl. Empty water out of the pot and set back on stove. Carefully take each tomato in the slotted spoon and run under cold water so you are able to peel off the skins without burning your fingers. Once the skin is removed, take a knife and cut out the core. Discard cores and skins.

Place cored tomatoes back into the same pot they were boiled in. Cut up any large chunks. Add all the other veggies and vinegar to the tomatoes. Bring to a medium boil and stir frequently so the bottom doesn’t burn. Mixture should thicken up as it cooks, about 10-15 minutes.

Once thickened, pull out jars from boiling water using a tongs and pour water out of them. Set them on a towel (open side up) and space them out. Then take a glass measuring cup with handle, or a ladle, and carefully fill each jar. If you don’t have a funnel, use a spoon to direct salsa into jars. Leave half inch of space at the top.

This recipe should make about 8-9 half pint jars of salsa, but it can vary. If you have a partial jar you can set that one in fridge to use first since they need to be filled to seal properly.

After they are filled, carefully wipe the rims if needed. Take lids out of simmering water and place on jars, followed by rings. Using a towel or hot pad, carefully screw rings on to tighten lids in place. Try to avoid touching the center of lid.

Once lids are on, place jars into boiling water again. The water should not cover the lids, so remove some water if needed. Boil for 15 minutes and remove, setting on a towel to cool. The small half pint jars seal relatively fast, so within a few minutes you may hear the “pop” of the seal setting. Let them sit and cool overnight before moving them. Store in a cool dry place out of the sun.

Now you will have salsa you can enjoy all year round, if it lasts that long! Don’t be afraid to play with the ingredients. I did 3 different colors of bell peppers and 2 different colors of onions. This can be adjusted depending on what you may have growing in your garden or what you are able to buy. Just try to keep the amount the same even if you change the variety of that ingredient. I’ve also included another free printable label sheet you can use to show the date it was made and what flavor it is.

Have fun and happy chopping!

Ashley
Coborn’s Inc. Graphic Designer

Homemade Made Easy www.cobornsblog.com

Homemade Pickles

Homemade Pickles www.cobornsblog.com

Ashley Maurer www.cobornsblog.comGrowing up I remember the end every summer my mom would take over the kitchen. The counter would be covered in jars, dill and cucumbers. The smell of the vinegar and fresh dill is not something that is easily forgotten.

This year my husband and I decided to grow our own garden for the first time. We have been very fortunate to have plenty of veggies, more than the two of us can eat. Last year we canned homegrown cucumbers that were given to us, so this year we are excited to pickle our own homegrown cucumbers.

Since I wanted to get this blog out in time for canning season, I bought cucumbers from my local Coborn’s store. The fresher the cucumbers are the better the pickles will turn out.

Here’s the method I used. This can be easily adjusted if you are doing larger batches.

Ingredients:
7-9 Medium to Large Cucumbers (quantity varies depending on size)
12 Garlic Cloves (2 Per Jar), peeled and smashed
Red Pepper Flakes (optional)
1 Large Bunch Fresh Dill Flowers Per Jar Or
1 tsp dill seed Per Jar

Brine:
4 Cups Cider Vinegar
4 Cups Water
6 Tbsp Pickling Salt or Kosher Salt

Equipment:
Knife
Cutting Board
6 Wide-Mouth Pint Jars With Lids
Funnel Or Glass Measuring Jar With Handle
Large Pot
Medium Pot
Small Pot
Jar Lifter (optional)
Jar Separator (optional)

Homemade Pickles Steps www.cobornsblog.comDirections:
First you want to make sure to sterilize the jars and lids by boiling them in a large pot of water for about 10 minutes. This will help kill any bacteria and increase the time they will stay preserved when stored in a cool, dry place that is out of the sun. If you are only doing a couple jars and are going to store them in the fridge, you can just wash the jars in hot soapy water or run them through the dishwasher on a sanitize cycle by themselves. You will still have to boil the lids in a smaller pot or they wont seal properly.

While the jars are getting sterilized, you can prep the cucumbers. Wash them very well and rub the skin with your hands to get any little prickly pieces or dirt off. Cut off the end with the blossom and discard that piece. It contains enzymes that can prevent the pickles from getting nice and crisp. Then cut them into spears or chips as desired.

To make the brine combine water, vinegar and salt in a pot and bring to a rolling boil ensuring all the salt has dissolved.

Pull the jars out once while the brine is heating up. A tongs works great for this. Set them open side up on a towel. Carefully add dill (or Dill Seed), smashed garlic cloves and any other optional ingredients to each jar. Fill the jar the rest of the way with the cucumber spears or chips until full. Make sure they are about ½ inch below the top of the jar. Pack them nice and full but try not to smash them.

Once brine is boiling, carefully pour using a ladle or glass measuring cup with a handle into each jar of cucumbers. A funnel comes in very handy for this. If needed, tap the jars on the counter to get any air bubbles out. Add more brine if needed until the cucumbers are covered, about ½ inch from the top.

Once the brine is in the jar, take a lid out of the small pot of boiling water. Using a fork for this may be helpful. Place lid on jar and screw ring on until tight. Jars are hot, so carefully hold with towel or potholder if needed.

At this point you have two options. If you’re only making a couple jars and want to be able to eat them sooner, you can let the jars sit out at room temperature overnight. Ideally they should seal as they cool making a slight “popping” noise. If they don’t pop that’s fine, they just wont keep quite as long. So any that don’t pop make sure to eat up first! After they have cooled, put them in the fridge and let them sit for at least a couple days before opening them.

If you want the pickles to be processed for longer storage, then you have one more step. After putting lids and rings on each jar, place the jars in boiling water. A jar separator will help the water circulate around the jars better, but if you don’t have one, just make sure the jars are spaced out as best as you can and that the water doesn’t go over the top of them.

The boil may subside after you place them in, so after it comes back to a full boil set the timer for no more than 5 minutes. I set mine for 4 so I didn’t feel rushed to get them out. Remove the jars carefully and let them sit out to cool overnight.

In the morning make sure the lids are sealed. If you can push down on any of the lids and hear a popping noise that means they didn’t seal properly. Put those in the fridge to eat first. The rest, once cooled and sealed can get placed in a cool, dry place out of the sun. Wait at least 8 weeks before opening. After they are opened make sure to store them in the fridge.

And that’s it! It takes a little bit of time to do, but the results are worth it. I’ve also included a free printable label sheet you can use so you know what date they were made and what flavors they are. Don’t be afraid to get creative. Some other ingredients you can try putting in to spice things up are red pepper flakes, jalapeño peppers and Serrano peppers just to name a few.

Another great thing about canning is the timing is great for Holiday gifts. If you process them for long-term storage, they will be ready to eat by winter. You can even put a piece of fabric on them or tie some ribbon around them to add some Holiday cheer.

Have fun and happy canning!

Ashley
Coborn’s Inc. Graphic Designer

Homemade Made Easy www.cobornsblog.com

Edgy Veggie – Homemade Hot Sauces

Edgy Veggie - Double Trouble Homemade Hot Sauces

 

Coborn's Blog: Edgy Veggie with Andrew
Andrew

Here comes the heat. Today, I’m sharing two recipes close to my heart (and my heartburn). I love spicy food, especially hot sauces. There’s a certain thrill, an endorphin rush and a spirit of conquest that comes with a truly spicy dish. If you’re like me, it’s not really hot until you can feel your eyelids sweat. If that’s not your thing, you can still use this recipe as a foundation to design a mild sauce and enhance your diet with the wonderful benefits of HEAT!

Capsaicin is a very special molecule. Aside from being responsible for the heat in peppers, Capsaicin touts some pretty incredible potential side benefits. In the heat of the summer, spicy foods make you sweat and cool you off. That’s why, for centuries, spicy ethnic cuisine has tended to reside closer to the equator. There’s also evidence that Capsaicin has the potential to boost metabolism and increase your ability to burn fat. Several studies have shown evidence of Capsaicin’s ability to ward off certain types of cancer and relieve pain. It’s really pretty incredible, and I implore you to do some digging on the topic if you’re a sceptic or aren’t a fan of heat. It might be a taste worth acquiring.

I’m sharing two different methods of preparing hot sauce. You can try using different peppers and other ingredients, these are DIY-licious templates for your wild experiments.

Edgy Veggie - Double Trouble Homemade Hot Sauces
They look so innocent. Don’t be fooled!

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • A sharp kitchen knife – dull knives and small peppers don’t mix
  • A large sauce pan and a stove
  • A blender or food processor
  • A strainer with small holes – wire mesh is ideal
  • Latex or vinyl gloves
  • Containers for storage – canning jars or sealable bottles

WARNING: Always wear gloves when handling hot peppers. Even Jalapeños and milder peppers can infuse your bare hands with a spicy oil that lasts for days. It’s really not fun if you rub your eyes afterwards, I know from experience. Twice.

PREPARING PEPPERS: If you want an easy way to prep your peppers, this is what I do: Slice off the top on your cutting board. Over a bowl or strainer, use a butter knife to break the white fiber and core away from the outside walls. Save the seeds to add them back into your recipe for added heat. Back to the cutting board,  halve the peppers the long way, then stack and slice.

SHELF LIFE: These sauces should last a good 6 months if you store them in the fridge in a sealed container.

Meanie Greenie Jalapenie (Recipe 1)

Ingredients

  • 1 Tbsp. – Olive oil
  • 1.5 Lb. Jalapeños – stemmed, seeded and sliced
  • 4 Cloves – Garlic, minced
  • 1/2 Cup – Diced onion
  • 1 tsp. Salt
  • 1 Tbsp. – Sugar
  • 1/2 Cup – Distilled white vinegar
  • 2 Cups – Water

Edgy Veggie – Double Trouble Homemade Hot Sauces - Step 1
Step 1:
 Heat the oil in a medium sauce pan over high heat. Add peppers, garlic, onions and salt. Saute for 5 minutes.

Edgy Veggie – Double Trouble Homemade Hot Sauces - Step 2Step 2: Add water and cook for an additional 20 minutes, stirring frequently. Remove from heat and set aside for a few minutes to cool.
Edgy Veggie – Double Trouble Homemade Hot Sauces - Step 3Step 3: Carefully transfer the mixture into your food processor. While blending, slowly add vinegar and salt.

Edgy Veggie – Double Trouble Homemade Hot Sauces - Step 4
Step 4:
Blend until consistent and smooth. Allow to cool, then transfer into a sterilized jar or bottle.

Blazing Arrow Habanero  (Recipe 2)

Ingredients

  • 2 Tbsp – Olive oil
  • 2 Poblano peppers – stemmed, seeded and sliced
  • 4 Habanero peppers – stemmed, seeded and sliced
  • 1 Cup – Diced onion
  • 4 Cloves – Garlic, minced
  • 1 Lb. – Ripe tomatoes, diced (I use Bushel Boys – they’re awesome and local)
  • 1 Cup – Distilled white vinegar
  • 1 Tbsp. – Salt
  • 1 Tbsp. – Sugar

Edgy Veggie – Double Trouble Homemade Hot Sauces - Step 1
Step 1:
 Heat the oil in a medium sauce pan over high heat. Add peppers, garlic, onions and salt. Saute for 5 minutes.

Edgy Veggie – Double Trouble Homemade Hot Sauces - Step 2Step 2: Add tomatoes, vinegar, sugar and salt. Reduce to medium heat, stirring frequently until the tomatoes turn saucy, 5-7 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside for a few minutes to cool.

Edgy Veggie – Double Trouble Homemade Hot Sauces - Step 3Step 3: Carefully transfer the mixture into your food processor. Blend until consistent and smooth.

Edgy Veggie – Double Trouble Homemade Hot Sauces - Step 4
Step 4: 
Allow to cool, then strain through a wire mesh strainer. Work the blended mash with a wooden spoon to extract the liquid, leaving the pulp in the strainer. Transfer into a sterilized jar or bottle.

Coborn's Edgy Veggie - Two Homemade Hot Sauce Recipes
Author: 
Recipe type: Sauce, Condiment, Hot Sauce
Cuisine: Southwest, Tex-Mex
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 20
 
Two different methods of preparing homemade hot sauce. You can try using different peppers and other ingredients, these are DIY-licious templates for your wild experiments.
Ingredients
  • Meanie Greenie Jalapenie (Recipe 1)
  • • 1 Tbsp. – Olive oil
  • • 1.5 Lb. Jalapeños – stemmed, seeded and sliced
  • • 4 Cloves – Garlic, minced
  • • ½ Cup – Diced onion
  • • 1 tsp. Salt
  • • 1 Tbsp. – Sugar
  • • ½ Cup – Distilled white vinegar
  • • 2 Cups – Water
  • ———————————————————
  • Blazing Arrow Habanero (Recipe 2)
  • • 2 Tbsp - Olive oil
  • • 2 Poblano peppers - stemmed, seeded and sliced
  • • 4 Habanero peppers - stemmed, seeded and sliced
  • • 1 Cup – Diced onion
  • • 4 Cloves – Garlic, minced
  • • 1 Lb. – Ripe tomatoes, diced
  • • 1 Cup – Distilled white vinegar
  • • 1 Tbsp. – Salt
  • • 1 Tbsp. – Sugar
Instructions
  1. Meanie Greenie Jalapenie (Recipe 1)
  2. Step 1: Heat the oil in a medium sauce pan over high heat. Add peppers, garlic, onions and salt. Saute for 5 minutes.
  3. Step 2: Add water and cook for an additional 20 minutes, stirring frequently. Remove from heat and set aside for a few minutes to cool.
  4. Step 3: Carefully transfer the mixture into your food processor. While blending, slowly add vinegar and salt.
  5. Step 4: Blend until consistent and smooth. Allow to cool, then transfer into a sterilized jar or bottle.
  6. ———————————————————
  7. Blazing Arrow Habanero (Recipe 2)
  8. Step 1: Heat the oil in a medium sauce pan over high heat. Add peppers, garlic, onions and salt. Saute for 5 minutes.
  9. Step 2: Add tomatoes, vinegar, sugar and salt. Reduce to medium heat, stirring frequently until the tomatoes turn saucy, 5-7 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside for a few minutes to cool.
  10. Step 3: Carefully transfer the mixture into your food processor. Blend until consistent and smooth.
  11. Step 4: Allow to cool, then strain through a wire mesh strainer. Work the blended mash with a wooden spoon to extract the liquid, leaving the pulp in the strainer. Transfer into a sterilized jar or bottle.

 

-Andrew
Senior Web Designer
Coborn’s, Inc.

Click Here for more blog articles written by Andrew

Edgy Veggie with Andrew - www.cobornsblog.com