Keep flies away from Food

www.cobornsblog.com - Coborn's Food Safety Coordinator, Kim
Kim

Hello again everyone! I was asked to talk to you today about flies and whether or not a person should be worried if a fly lands on their food. Well……it is not a very pleasant subject because as much as we would like to dismiss them as just pesty little buggers that like to ruin our outdoor food fun, they really are capable of carrying various pathogens (the bacteria that can cause disease). It is for this reason we do not want flies landing on our food. Continue reading “Keep flies away from Food”

Do I really need to use separate cutting boards?

Do I really need to use separate cutting boards?  Cobornsblog.com

www.cobornsblog.com - Coborn's Food Safety Coordinator, Kim
Kim

As you’re strolling through the stores this holiday season searching for the perfect gift for that foodie friend you may be running across the colored set of cutting boards. And then you stop and ask yourself is this truly something that would be useful in the kitchen?  Or necessary?  The answer truly could go both ways. The ultimate goal of the separate cutting boards is to reduce even further the risk of cross-contamination in one’s kitchen. Even commercial kitchens use these to prevent cross-contamination.  Effective cleaning will go a long way in reducing that contamination risk; however, food safety is all about building multiple barriers in your food handling processes.  Colored, even just separate cutting boards, are a good option in providing that extra barrier… so when you’re working with chicken, the yellow cutting board is used and the red one for red meat, green for produce and so on. Continue reading “Do I really need to use separate cutting boards?”

Using the Right Knife for the Right Job: A Guide to the Kitchen Knife Block

Finding the Right Knife for the Right Job: A Guide to the Kitchen Knife Block

www.cobornsblog.com - A Cut Above with Chef Todd
Chef Todd

Whether you are slicing fruit for a smoothie, deboning chicken for a crock pot meal or filleting fish, the knife you use in the kitchen is essential to the job you are trying to accomplish and to the efficiency level you will be achieving while preparing your food. No matter the task at hand or your ability level in the kitchen, it is incredibly important to equip yourself with the proper tools while cooking to ensure less time wasted, proper technique and increased skill, therefore helping to make you an even better cook. Continue reading “Using the Right Knife for the Right Job: A Guide to the Kitchen Knife Block”

The Truth About the 5 Second Rule

The Truth About the 5 Second Rule

Coborn's Blog: The Kitchen Detective
Kim

Hi Everyone! My topic for today’s blog is the “5 Second Rule”. I think at some point in time we all have either given into the 5 second rule and/or at least contemplated it, right?  I, myself, can say that is true. Saying to myself… “Really, what could possibly be wrong with this, it was only on the floor for a second?!?!”  Well, let me tell you, there are various organisms including some fairly harmful bacteria that reside in the soil:  Listeria, Salmonella, E.coli… just to name a few. Granted, not all bacteria residing in the soil are harmful, but the reality is we do not know where these harmful ones are lurking. They don’t glow, smell or leave any type of calling card that let you know where they are residing, so it is best to presume they may just be there!

Also, just thinking about all of the places our shoes take us each day, from either walking across the grass to pick up something blowing in the wind to walking through a park or down a trail where a dog needed to do it’s business or a bird flew overhead leaving nature’s duty in it’s path. This leaves the bottoms of our shoes a nice little harborage area for germs, in turn leaving some of these bugs behind on the floor as we walk through the cafeteria or into the restaurant or across our own floor at home. Some might say, “Well, I remove my shoes when I get home.” I think we all have experienced, 5 Second Rule5 Second Rulethough, even if we are committed to taking our shoes off in our homes, that our floors still get dirty. Either from dust, old food debris that may have fallen on the floor from previous meals and even dirt (because we cheat from time to time, don’t we? “I just need to run in quick and get my cell phone that I left on the counter!”)  …your secret is safe with me.

If the potential for some harmful microorganisms lurking on the floor doesn’t raise a cause for just throwing the food out, what about the thought of any physical object sticking to the food item. A piece of hair, a small pebble or that little dust bunny. Biting into these physical objects makes eating not very pleasurable either.

So the next time someone shouts, “5 Second Rule!” Think twice… Do you want to take the risk? Or would you rather pick it up, throw it out, wash your hands (of course) and go for another bite of something that hasn’t spent even a second on the floor!

Wishing you healthy and SAFE eating!

Kim
Coborn’s, Inc, Food Safety & Nutrition Manager, Registered Dietitian

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www.cobornsblog.com - The Ktichen Detetive

 

 

 

Cast Iron Cooking

Cast Iron Cooking - www.cobornsblog.com

www.cobornsblog.com - Family, Friends & Food with Jayne
Jayne

September has officially arrived and I have to accept the fact that summer has passed. As much as I love our fall season it is always so sad when the kids go back to school and the summer fun at the lake starts to quiet down. Oh well, on to the next season! When I spend time at the lake, especially during the fall, I usually make comfort foods and oh how I love them. One of my favorite things to use in my kitchen at the cabin is a cast iron skillet. I remember as a kid my mom using only her skillet to make bacon, eggs and hash browns every Saturday morning. I can still hear the sizzling of the bacon and how the scent filled the entire cabin. No food could compare when she used her cast iron skillet. There are so many myths about the cast iron skillet that I thought this would be a perfect subject to talk about in my September blog. I hear from so many of my friends that they have received one of these skillets as a wedding gift and store it in the cupboard because they have no idea how to use it. So here are a few hints to get you started with being a Cast Iron Skillet Professional!

→ View all the recipes listed in this blog on our YouTube channel!

Benefits to using a Cast Iron Skillet

  • Using a cast iron skillet instead of a non-stick skillet allows you to avoid the fumes that accompany most non-stick cookware.
  • Besides the stove, you can use a cast iron skillet in the oven, at any temperature.
  • By using a cast iron skillet you can create quality homemade fish sticks, potato pancakes, and French toast, complete with golden brown, crispy exteriors. Contrast this with non-stick cookware, which makes browning nearly impossible.
  • Since cast iron does not scratch, you don’t need to use plastic utensils, and there is no fear of using your silverware to stir or scoop. It lasts for so long that many people still use cast iron cookware that they have inherited.

How to Season a Cast Iron SkilletHow to season a Cast Iron Skillet - www.cobornsblog.com

  • Preheat oven to 325°F.
  • Wash the skillet with warm, soapy water and a sponge or stiff brush. Cast iron should not be normally washed with soap, but its fine here since the pan is about to be seasoned.
  • Rinse and thoroughly dry the skillet.
  • Using a cloth or paper towel, apply a thin coat of vegetable oil to the inside an outside of the skillet.  Vegetable oil is most commonly recommended for seasoning.
  • Place the skillet upside down on the oven’s center rack.
  • Place a sheet of aluminum foil below the rack to catch any drips.
  • Bake for an hour.
  • Turn off heat and allow the skillet to cool completely before removing from the oven.
  • A seasoned skillet is smooth, shiny, and non-stick. You’ll know it’s time to re-season if food sticks to the surface or if the skillet appears dull or rusted.

How to Clean a Cast Iron SkilletHow to clean a Cast Iron Skillet - www.cobornsblog.com

  • Clean the skillet immediately after use, while it is still hot or warm. Avoid soaking the pan or leaving it in the sink, because it could rust.
  • Wash the skillet by hand, using hot water and a sponge or stiff brush. Avoid using the dishwasher, soap, or steel wool, as these may strip the pan’s seasoning.
  • To remove stuck-on food, scrub the pan with a paste of coarse kosher salt and water. Boiling water in the pan may also loosen stubborn food residue.
  • Thoroughly towel-dry the skillet or dry it on the stove over low heat for 5 minutes and let cool.
  • Using a paper towel, apply a light coat of vegetable oil to the inside of the skillet.

After you have seasoned your cast iron skillet you are ready to start a whole new world of cooking.

I’ve always loved the fall season because of the cooler nights and the beautiful colors, so when I’m at the cabin my cooking skills become a hobby and I get the chance to experiment with more recipes than I normally do at home during the busy work week. I’m still into simple and quick recipes because I want to spend as much time as I can on the pontoon and with family and friends, so here are a couple recipes that I would like to share with you to get you started with your own Cast Iron Skillet. Enjoy…..I did!

Cast Iron Cooking – Chicken Fajitas


Cast Iron Cooking - Chicken Fajitas
Serves: 6
 
Ingredients
  • 4 T. Vegetable Oil, divided
  • 2 T. Lemon Juice
  • 1.5 tsp. Seasoned Salt
  • 1.5 tsp. Dried Oregano
  • 1.5 tsp. Ground Cumin
  • 1 tsp. Garlic Powder
  • ½ tsp. Chili Powder
  • ½ tsp. Paprika
  • ½ tsp. Crushed Red Pepper Flakes, optional
  • 1.5 Lbs. Boneless Skinless Chicken Breast, cut into thin strips
  • 1 Medium Sweet Red Pepper, julienned
  • 1 Medium Green Pepper, julienned
  • ½ Cup Onions, thinly sliced
  • 6 - 8" Flour Tortillas, warmed
  • Shredded Cheddar Cheese
  • Taco Sauce
  • Salsa
  • Guacamole
  • Sour Cream
Instructions
  1. In a large re-sealable plastic bag, combine 2 tablespoons oil, lemon juice and seasonings; add the chicken.
  2. Seal and turn to coat; refrigerate for 1-4 hours.
  3. In a large cast iron skillet, sauté peppers and onions in remaining oil until crisp-tender.
  4. Remove and keep warm.
  5. Discard marinade.
  6. In the same skillet, cook chicken over medium-high heat for 5-6 minutes or until internal temperature reaches 165°F.
  7. Add peppers back in with the chicken and heat until warm.
  8. Spoon filling down the center of tortillas; fold in half.
  9. Serve with cheese, taco sauce, salsa guacamole and sour cream.

 

Cast Iron Cooking – Kit Kat Skillet Cookie

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Cast Iron Cooking: Kit Kat Skillet Cookie - www.cobornsblog.com

Cast Iron Cooking - Kit Kat Skillet Cookie
 
Ingredients
  • ½ Cup Butter, softened
  • 1 Cup Dark Brown Sugar
  • 2 Eggs
  • 1 tsp. Vanilla Extract
  • 2 Cups Flour
  • 1 tsp. Salt
  • 1 tsp. Baking Soda
  • 2 Cups Kit Kat Bites
  • 1 Cup Chocolate Chips
  • Drizzle of Caramel flavored topping
  • Drizzle of Chocolate flavored topping
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350°F.
  2. Spray a large cast iron skillet with non-stick baking spray.
  3. In large bowl add butter, brown sugar, eggs and vanilla in bowl and mix with electric mixer.
  4. Beat at medium speed until creamy.
  5. Add flour, salt and baking soda, beat at low speed until flour is combined, turn to medium speed and beat 2 minutes.
  6. Fold in Kit Kat bites and Chocolate Chips.
  7. Pour cookie dough into skillet and spread evenly.
  8. Bake 35 minutes or until golden brown.
  9. Drizzle caramel and chocolate flavored topping over warm cookie.
  10. Set aside and cool for 30 minutes before slicing.

 

Cast Iron Cooking – S’more Dip

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Cast Iron Cooking: S'more Dip - www.cobornsblog.com

Cast Iron Cooking - S'more Dip
Serves: 4
 
Ingredients
  • 1 Cup Chocolate Chips
  • 8 Large Marshmallows
  • Graham Crackers for dipping
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 450°F.
  2. Spray a cast iron skillet with non-stick baking spray.
  3. Add the chocolate chips.
  4. Snip the large marshmallows in half and top the chocolate chips with them.
  5. Place skillet in oven.
  6. Bake 7 to 9 minutes, until marshmallows turn golden brown.
  7. Serve with graham crackers for scooping.

 

Jayne
Coborn’s, Inc. Meat and Seafood Merchandiser

Click Here for more articles written by Jayne or Click Here for more videos by Jayne.
www.cobornsblog.com - Family, Friends and Food with Jayne